Folksonomy or Collabulary?

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 18 Second

I picked this item up from Beth Kantor’s blog who references a report by JISC on Web 2.0 technologies (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/techwatch/tsw0701b.pdf)

I have to say that, on the whole, the report gives a very good introduction to Web 2.0, and provides some context to the hyperbole surrounding this topic. It gives covers quite a wide spectrum of topics, from html, the invention of the Web by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the long tail, the development of social networking and publishing tools such as wikis and blogs and technologies such as Ajax, Microformats.

My only criticism is the seemingly compelling and pretentious need for academia to continually invent new terms (jargon) for what is quite often a simple task or process. I’ve had enough problems getting people I encounter in the public sector to understand what blogs and wikis are. I’ve tried to avoid using the term ‘folksonomy’ where possible,  preferring ‘tagging’ instead, which most people seem to understand.

And then I come across the term ‘collabulary’, which has now been introduced into the English language because we’re misusing the term ‘folksonomy’. There is (apparently) a distinction to be made between a folksonomy (a collection of tags created by an individual for their own personal use) and a collabulary (a collective vocabulary)

The term folksonomy is generally acknowledged to have been coined by Thomas Vander Wal.
According to Vander Wal, folksonomy tagging is done in a social environment (shared and open) and is not collaborative and it is not a form of categorisation. He makes the point that tagging done by one person on behalf of another is not folksonomy and that the value of a folksonomy is derived from people using their own vocabulary in order to add explicit meaning to the information or object they are consuming (either as a user or producer).

So, if I’ve understood this correctly, information I tag for myself is a folksonomy, but if I want to share my tags with a community, I’m contributing to a collabulary. Well, I for one will not be introducing this term into the local government communities I’m presently engaged with. I’m trying to demystify much of the present jargon that Web 2.0 practitioners spout, any and all of which can act as barriers to the use and adoption of social media tools.  Whether I’m tagging for myself or tagging in a wider collaborative sense, I’m just adding labels to things I want to be able to find again. I don’t really care whether it’s a folksonomy or a collabulary, and neither should the users of Web 2.0 tools.

Download what_is_web_2.0 (Jisc).pdf

About Post Author

Stephen Dale

I’m a life-long learner with an insatiable curiosity about life. I love travel, good food, and good company. I’m happy to share what I know with others….even the interesting stuff! My outlook on life is pretty well captured in this quote from a book about the legend of King Arthur: “The best thing for being sad,” replied Merlin, beginning to puff and blow, “is to learn something. That’s the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then — to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the only thing for you. Look what a lot of things there are to learn.” ― T.H. White, The Once and Future King So much to learn, so little time!
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Previous post Free photo editing at Picnik
Next post More on Collabularies

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.